Hearing Sciences: Hearing Clinics and hearing aid professionals in Alliston, Bolton, Bradford, Georgetown, Orangeville and more.

Words of
Hellen Keller

“When you lose your vision, you lose contact with things. When you lose your hearing, you lose contact with people.”

Words of
Hellen Keller

“When you lose your vision, you lose contact with things. When you lose your hearing, you lose contact with people.”

Words of
Hellen Keller

“When you lose your vision, you lose contact with things. When you lose your hearing, you lose contact with people.”

Words of
Hellen Keller

“When you lose your vision, you lose contact with things. When you lose your hearing, you lose contact with people.”

Welcome to hearing sciences

See what we can do for you

How can
hearing aids help?

Learn how hearing aids can help you!

How can hearing aids help?

On the basis of your hearing test results, the Hearing Instrument Specialist or Audiologist at our hearing clinics will determine whether hearing aids will provide you with benefit. Hearing aids are effective at improving speech understanding for most people with sensorineural hearing loss. When choosing a hearing aid, the clinician will consider your hearing ability, work and home activities, physical limitations, medical condition, and cosmetic preferences. For many people, cost is also an important factor. You and your clinician will decide which hearing aids will be best for you. Wearing two hearing aids helps balance sounds, improves your understanding of words in noisy situations, and makes it easier to locate the direction of sounds.

What might I experience while adjusting to my hearing aids?

Initially it may feel odd that something is in your ears. Some people report that it “tickles” for the first few hours. You will hear things that you may not have heard in years. Soft birdsong, children’s voices, footsteps, clocks ticking, fan noises, computer key boards, turn signals in cars will become audible to you. While wearing your hearing aids you will find that adjusting to these sounds will become second nature through regular and continual usage.

Your clinician will teach you to use and care for your hearing aids. Practice putting in and taking out the aids, cleaning, identifying right and left aids, and replacing the batteries. It’s important that you become familiar with your hearing aid so you do not feel overwhelmed with all the new information.

Your hearing aids should be comfortable. Inform your clinician of any areas that may be too tight as modifications are easy to do in the hearing clinic during your initial or follow up visit. Your own voice may sound too loud. This is called the occlusion effect and is very common for new hearing aid users. Your clinician may be able to minimize or correct this problem; however, most people get used to it over time. Try to remember you have a hearing loss. Your brain has become accustomed to interpreting incomplete sounds when you listen with a hearing loss. Now it needs to adjust to the new way of hearing the full spectrum of sounds.

Your hearing aid may "whistle." When this happens, you are experiencing feedback, which could be caused by poor fit, incorrect placement, or excess wax. Your clinician will check for these issues and provide a solution.

You may hear background noise. Background noise is apparent in every situation. Whether at a restaurant, theater, playing cards or bingo, it is a by-product of our lifestyle. Most advanced or premium hearing aids are able to deal with these signals while not compromising speech understanding. Keep in mind that a hearing aid does not completely separate the sounds you want to hear from the ones you do not want to hear. Discuss this with your clinician.

Tips for maintaining your new hearing aid

  • Open the battery door each time you remove the hearing aid. This helps dry-out the electronics and prevents moisture damage.
  • Clean the hearing aid on a daily basis. Use the brush provided and a tissue. This will prevent wax from building up. Turn the hearing aid sound outlet down towards the floor so when brushing the wax it falls down and not back into the hearing aid.
  • Always remove your hearing aid from your ear before retiring to bed.
  • Have your ears cleared of wax on a regular basis.
  • If you are outdoors for most of the day or in high humidity environments such as kitchens, use a dry-aid kit daily. These kits contain moisture absorbing silicone crystals. The battery must be removed from the hearing aid before placing in the kit.
  • Insert and remove your hearing aid over a soft surface (carpet or sofa) to avoid potential damage if dropped.